[Abrife] 사랑하는 건축가 동료 여러분께.

Charles Holland, director at UK based firm FAT Architecture (see their public bathroom proposal for London) runs Fantastic Journal, an interesting blog on which he recently published the following open letter to us, the other architects:

Please stop entering design competitions. It’s sheer folly. Here’s why:

1. It’s massively wasteful of your time and resources. Can you think of another comparable industry, or, more pertinently, profession, that spends so much time and money on bidding for work? Do doctors undertake a number of unpaid, speculative operations in order to convince people that they really need a hip replacement? No.

2. It gives away your main asset – your ideas – for free. After that, the rest is routine.

3. You are highly unlikely to win. This is just a fact. Some are better at them than others but no one wins them all and most lose often.

4. Even if you do win, it’s still unlikely that the building will be built. Most competitions are speculative, not in the sense that the client is looking for experimental architecture, but in the sense that there is little or no funding in place and they have not informed you of all the impediments still in the way of the project.

5. Therefore, there is often only one thing more disappointing than losing a competition and that’s winning one (in the long run).

6. They are a pretty terrible way of procuring a building. Imagine a system where you want something but you’re not sure exactly what it is. So you make a list of things you think you want and invite everyone in the world to send you their ideas for what it looks like. You have no other interaction with them, communicate – if at all – by email and, in the end, hope for the best and pick the one you fancy. This is the architectural competition process. It’s similar to internet dating, but less fun.

7. Competitions momentarily flatter you into thinking that you are designing, say,Oslo Opera House or a New Town outside Madrid but, in reality, you’re not. Until you get the commission it’s just pretend.

8. No one else in the world understands why you’re doing it. They just get used to you not coming out or refusing to take a holiday or forgetting to wash for five days. But they still think you’re mad.

9. You could do without the stress. All that time. All that effort. The all-nighters and the break-neck journey to the printers to get the boards made up! The intern dispatched to Inverness to hand them in because you’ve missed the courier’s deadline! The anxious wait for the results that sometimes never come! Honestly, you could do without it.

10. Remember: it’s not the failure that will kill you. It’s the hope.

So, if you’re thinking of entering a competition, don’t! Take your office down the pub instead. It will be more fun and cost a lot less. You might even meet someone down there who wants to give you a job. Remember: if you stop, I can too.

 

영국의 회사 FAT Architecture를 운영하고 있는 Charles Holland는 블로그 Fantastic Journal을 운영하고 있다. 그는 다른 건축가들에게 다음과 같은 공개 서한을 보냈다. 그는 이 서한에서 디자인 공모전에 참여하지 말 것을 요구하였으며, 그 이유는 다음과 같다.

1. 이는 시간과 자원에 대한 커다란 낭비이기 때문이다. 다른 전문적 직업의 경우 일을 얻기 위하여 얼마나 일하는가를 생각해 보아야 할 것이다. 의사의 경우 수술이 필요하다고 믿게 하기 위하여 지불받지 않고 일을 하는가?

2. 당신의 주된 자산인 생각을 남에게, 그 것도 공짜로 주는 결과를 낳는다. 그리고 나머지 과정은 일반적인 행위이다.

3. 승산이 매우 적다는 것이다. 물론 어떤 이는 다른 사람보다 낳다. 그러나 모두가 당선 되는 경우는 없다. 당선되지 못하는 경우가 대부분이다.

4. 당선된다 하더라도 건물이 지어질 지는 확실치 않다.

5. 따라서 공모전에서 당선되지 못한 것 보다 못한 결과를 낳는 경우가 종종 있다.

6. 건물을 설계한다는 과정 자체가 이상한 것이다. 무엇을 원하는데 그 것이 무엇인지를 모르는 대부분의 경우이다. 이에 따라 본인이 원한다고 생각하는 것을 열거하고 전 세계 사람들이 참여하도록 하며 이들의 생각을 얻는다. 상호간의 대화는 없다. 단지 선택되어지기를 바라는 꿈만을 가지는 것이다. 즉, 건축 공모전의 과정은 인터넷 데이트와 유사하며, 물론 재미 또한 없다.

7. 공모전은 순간적으로 당신이 생각하는 것을 이야기 할 수 있다. 그러나 실제 프로젝트를 맡기 전까지 그렇다 할 수 없다.

8. 세상 어디에도 당신이 하는 일을 이해하는 사람은 없다. 당신이 열심히 일을 아무리 하여도, 상대는 당신을 미친 사람으로 취급하기 마련이다.

9. 당신은 스트레스 없이도 일을 할 수 있다. 항시. 기나긴 기다림의 대부분은 공허한 결과를 낳는다.

10. 명심하라. 실패가 당신을 죽이는 것이 아니다. 희망이 당신을 죽음으로 몰아 넣는다.

공모전에 참가할 생각을 접어라. 술집으로 가서 더 많은 사람을 만나고 당신에게 일거리를 줄 사람을 찾는 것이 더욱 현명할 것이다.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s